Understanding the Basics of Fixed Maturity Plans as Investment Products

Fixed Maturity Plans (FMPs) are touted as safer debt instruments, with potential to earn higher than bank savings account and fixed-deposit. The popularity of FMPs appeal to investors who prefer to lock their investments at higher interest rates, when and where the trend for such rates are currently on the rise.

Higher earnings though are not assured as FMPs offer only indicative yields; denoting that actual gain that can be realized from investing on FMPs has chances of being lower or higher than the indicative yield stated at the time the FMP became available as New Fund Offer (NFO).

How Do Fixed Maturity Plans Work?

First off, FMP investment product becomes available by way of a New Fund Offer (NFO) coming from a mutual fund company. The latter intends to pool money that will be loaned out to a particular business at a fixed interest rate, over a fixed maturity period coinciding with the maturity date as the FMP investment. FMPs are heavily debt-oriented but protects the returns of investors from interest fluctuations.

Yet, in the event the business entity on which the debt scheme was awarded, fails to pay at maturity, this denotes that FMP investors will not receive the entire maturity value indicated during the launch of the NFO.

Who Invests in FMPs?

In light of its long term nature, FMPs however, are recommended as ideal investment products for investors who can park their money on long term investments of up to 3 years at the least, to 5 years at the most. The need to stay invested throughout the term is to harness the benefits of indexation of taxes pertaining to capital gains derived from long term investments.

FMP investors therefore who do not have liquidity requirements for the next 3 to 5 years, have better opportunities at raking in returns at a lower tax expense to earnings ratio.

Benefits of indexation of Taxes on FMPs relate to a specific tax rate on Long Term Capital Gains. As opposed to Savings or Time Deposit to which interests earned are immediately reduced by corresponding taxes withheld on interest earnings realized during short periods. The difference in taxation though, benefits those who have no liquidity requirements for at least three years.

Asset Manager Bitwise Submits Analysis to Show that 95% of Bitcoin Trading are Hoaxes

Bitwise, the company that pioneered crypto asset management and founded the world’s first cryptocurrency index fund, conducted a study that revealed 95% of bitcoin trading reported are mere hoaxes. The asset management company followed up a survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal in light of concerns voiced by regulators about cryptocurrency market, and its vulnerability to trading manipulation.

While in the process of listing the first bitcoin Exchange Traded Fund (ETF), Bitwise met with officials of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to submit its analysis. The firm reviewed the top data furnished by CoinMarketCap.com and analyzed the volume of top 81 crypto exchanges. The analysis revealed that of the aggregate $6 billion reported by CoinMarketCap as average daily bitcoin volume, only $273 million worth is legitimate.

Matthew Hougan, Bitwise Global Head of Research remarked,

“People looked at cryptocurrency and said this market is a mess; that’s because they were looking at data that was manipulated. The idea that there’s fake volume has been rumored for a long time; we were just the first people to systematically look at which exchanges were delivering real volume,”

Salient Points of the Bitwise Bitcoin Trade Analysis

In assessing the $27 million average trade volume (ATV) reported by San Francisco-based company, Coinbase Pro, the asset management company established a bitcoin “median spread” of one (1) cent. Median Spread is significant because it pertains to the difference between a bitcoin seller’s asking price and the price a bitcoin buyer would be willing to place as exchange. On Bitwise’s evaluation, Coinbase Pro’s trading scenario is legitimate.

Pitting the Coinbase Pro data against those that made a showing of having the biggest reported exchanges tracked by CoinMarketCap.com, Bitwise found bitcoin exchanges in most entities have extreme median spread.

Reported exchanges at CoinBene for one, resulted to a $15 median spread, which Bitwise found as dubious. CoinBene’s AVT was 18 times greater than that of Coinbase Pro. It therefore came as a surprise that such volume would come from a trading company that has a median spread that is 1500 greater than a cryptotrader like Coinbase Pro that has 1 cent median spread.

Not surprisingly, further analysis of reported bitcoin trading revealed median spreads as extreme as $300 and higher.

The fake exchanges are driven by fees awarded to those who can attract listings for fresh initial coin offers (ICO), targeting those seeking to have their cryptocurrency placed on where heavy trading transpires. Autonomous Next previously reported data showing fees ranging from $1M to $3M per listing; whilst suggesting the crypto cycle incentives promote fraudulent behavior from bad actors.